Conserving the beauty, character, and diversity of significant lands in far Northern California.

support

About Us

img_4545_2.jpg

 

 

 

 

 

 



Shasta Land Trust is governed by an all-volunteer Board of Directors:

 

 Muffy

Muffy Berryhill 

I’ve lived in California since I was three years old when my family moved here from Milwaukee, Wisconsin. Currently I teach Communication classes part-time at Shasta College and consult with a variety of social service projects. Previously I was the Director of First 5 Shasta. When I lived in the Oak Run/Whitmore area I drove into town through open pastures and rolling hills. I first became involved with Shasta Land Trust to conserve spaces like this and it’s gratifying to be part of an organization that has protected over 20,000 acres. But, it’s the future of the Land Trust that has me hooked. How exciting to see the Great Shasta Rail Trail coming to fruition; to be working on new easements; and to be envisioning land that SLT could own, offering us a home and a place for education, events and outings. It’s inspiring that as members of the Shasta Land Trust we’re making all this happen. I love to hike, kayak, and snowshoe so I definitely live in the right place!

 

Stokes

John Stokes

Board Chair

 

I was born here in Redding. I devote my time to Shasta Land Trust because I believe in the Shasta Land Trust's mission of conserving significant land here in Shasta County.  We help maintain open space, habitat and working ranches.  These are all important features of this place where I choose to live.  I enjoy camping, hiking, snowshoeing, and kayaking. I enjoy camping at Lassen Park in the summer or backpacking in the Trinity Alps. 

Ruffner

Nancy Ruffner Secretary/Treasurer

I was born and raised in Minnesota and I have been retired from the US Forest Service for about three years. My husband, Tom, and I moved to Redding in 1979 and the first thing that attracted us was the natural beauty of the area and all of the great outdoor opportunities there were. As Redding developed it seemed important to us that we help with the effort to maintain open space. Since I’m retired, I have some spare time to devote to the Land Trust and its mission. I like to run, hike and kayak and the Redding area is particularly suited to all of those activities. I think Whiskeytown National Park is my favorite spot. When Tom and I drove up the valley to Redding for the first time it was really hot but we drove out to Whiskeytown Lake and it was just so spectacular we decided we wanted to live here.

 

Koch 

Don Koch

I was born and raised in Sacramento. My wife and I have lived in Redding since 1990. I served with the California Department of Fish and Game (now Fish and Wildlife) for over 30 years.  I have had the opportunity to work with the SLT since its inception in 1998 and I have always been impressed with the staff and volunteers and their numerous and significant accomplishments in conserving lands in Shasta County. So why wouldn't I want to invest my time working with such a great organization? Additionally, I truly believe that the SLT's success of working with willing land owners to protect their lands with conservation easements, while maintaining them as working ranches has the greatest opportunity to conserve Shasta County lands for fish, wildlife and folks. While there are countless outdoor activities locally, I enjoy fly fishing on the Upper Sacramento River and on the lakes and streams in eastern Shasta and Tehama counties.  Bike riding on the River Trail is something I also enjoy year-round.  I really don’t have a favorite spot – anywhere outside is a favorite spot.

 

Gregg

Gregg Werner

 

I am originally from Wichita, Kansas with stops in Arizona, and southern and central California. Redding has been home for the last 12 years. I mange conservation projects for The Nature Conservancy in Northern California. I devote time to Shasta Land Trust because it is composed of wonderful people, doing great work of lasting value to our regions. I enjoy fishing, biking, hiking and generally exploring Northern California.

Debra

Debra Townsend

Vice Chair

 

I was born in Minnesota and spent some of my youth in Wisconsin.  Sacramento, California was my home until 2012 when I relocated to Palo Cedro. I worked for the State of California for 34 years, with approximately 22 years with the Wildlife Conservation Board.  I enjoyed a career as a Land Agent and retired as the Asst. Executive Director of the Land Acquisition Program. It is a privilege to use my prior experience with the Wildlife Conservation Board to promote conservation efforts by the Shasta Land Trust.  I like to fish and have had success at Hat Creek.  I also enjoy walking the scenic trails of Shasta County.


 

Karen Coffey

Karen Coffey

 

 

 

I have lived in Shasta and Tehama counties for 5 1/2 years and have grown to love this area that I now call home. My background comes from serving on conservation boards in Vermont and New Hampshire. I headed up watershed restoration projects in Vermont and was former Executive Director of the Lake Memphremagog Watershed Council, where I received recognition from the EPA Northeast District  as a recipient of a “Environmental Merit Award”.  My community outreach and work with farmers and landowners on watershed protection, restoration, and conservation led me to work closely with the Vermont Land Trust.  I feel that land trust organizations have the right take on how we should look at, and protect, our open space from further development while protecting its resources.

Shasta Land Trust staff:

  Anne  SusanPartridge 2 Max website photo
  Anne Murphy
Executive Director
Susan Partridge
Administrative Assistant
Maxwell Odland
AmeriCorps Member
Conservation Associate


SLT Logo 0words color.JPGIn addition to our hard-working Board of Directors and our dedicated staff, Shasta Land Trust accomplishes its goals through the inspiring contributions from our volunteers

Currently, our standing committees consist of:
- Lands Committee (Chair: Dave Bunte)
- Finance Committee (Chair: Nancy Ruffner)
- People Committee (Chair: Muffy Berryhill)
- Newsletter Committee (Chair: Ann Duchi)
- Environmental Education Committee (Co-Chairs:  Dave Bush & Max Odland)
- Resource Development Committee (Chair:  Francis Duchi)

We also have great volunteer committees which make all of our various events possible.  Last year we had the following outstanding leadership:
- 2014 Wildways Steering Committee (Chair:  Nancy Ruffner)
- 2014 Wildways Kickoff Committee (Co-Chairs: Nancy Wilson, Susan Partridge)

As you can see, we have an enormous group of volunteers that give substantial amounts of their time and talent to help Shasta Land Trust succeed.  There's room for everyone to contribute to Shasta Land Trust, and we hope you can join us!

Now, What is a Land Trust, anyway?

Land Trusts are local, regional, or statewide nonprofit organizations that help protect important land resources for public benefit. As community organizations they understand and respond to the needs of the land and people in their regions.

America has over 1,700 land trusts protecting approximately 4.7 million acres. These include farms, wetlands, wildlife habitat, urban gardens and parks, forests, ranches, watersheds, coastlines, river corridors, and trails. Land trusts provide a cost-effective approach to conservation. They often protect land at a cost far below market value.

Land trusts, with their ability to respond quickly and creatively to local conservation needs, are uniquely suited to meet the challenge of saving these lands. As private organizations land trusts offer quick response, flexibility, and confidentiality. They are often effective when government falls short.

Land trusts are the fastest growing conservation movement today, with new land trusts forming at an average rate of more than one per week. Land trusts offer a cooperative approach to land conservation. They are a creative answer to today's conservation challenges.